Before my PhD program – which required me to limit myself to one specialty (sugar addiction) – I had studied food intolerances.

Many books on the subject begin with reactions to food, then move on to chemicals in our homes and offices, gasoline fumes, and more. As important as these things are, they are not about nutrition.

My interest in food intolerances has always been their link with addiction.

Recently, I “attended” a J.J. Virgin, whose first book (I believe) was on food intolerances and how to eliminate those foods to improve health and lose weight. The webinar rekindled my interest in food intolerances and addictions.

Common triggers of food intolerance include chocolate, corn, soy, wheat (or other gluten-containing foods), peanuts, dairy products, eggs, sugars, and other sweeteners.

What does food intolerance look like?

Signs and symptoms may include headaches / migraines, joint pains, fatigue, sleepiness, heart palpitations, depression, irritability, stomach aches, bloating, and many more.

As digested food moves through the bloodstream, the effects of an intolerance can manifest almost anywhere in the body.

Food reactions may be the same every time food is eaten, such as a rash.

Or the reactions might vary – say, a non-itchy rash once and itchy-free rash another time.

The reaction could be cumulative. Perhaps a small portion of the food causes no reaction, but a portion eaten again that day, or several days in a row, causes one.

Addiction is another possible reaction that can develop over time.

What are the causes of food intolerances?

The causes are many, but let’s keep it simple.ทำเงินง่ายกับการพนัน

One of the causes is a genetic intolerance or a tendency to it.

We can become intolerant to a food that we eat often or in large quantities. Eating too much of a food consumes specific enzymes to digest that food, so complete digestion is prevented.

This can cause improperly digested food particles moving through the digestive tract and bloodstream, triggering an immune reaction. Undigested and unabsorbed food does not provide nutrients.

We can also become reactive to a food we eat along with another trigger food. So the list of triggers could increase, resulting in malnutrition.

Food reactions can change over time

The guiding principle of the human body is homeostasis.

When a trigger food is first eaten, the body attempts to restore homeostasis by getting rid of the offending food. It prevents absorption by binding antibodies to partially digested food while it is in the intestine. This could successfully eliminate food before it can pass into the bloodstream.

If food enters the bloodstream, it can trigger inflammation. The acute reaction can be brief and the body can quickly return to homeostasis.

If someone continues to eat a trigger food over time, the body undergoes an adaptation. The immune system may become slower (or less able) to respond. The reaction may now occur slower than the acute reaction. Signs or symptoms can last longer, sometimes hours or days.